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« Niger could sign new deal with Areva within days: mines minister | Main | Japan’s New Energy Plan Could be Positive for Uranium’s Future »
Tuesday
Apr222014

China: Nuclear plants to get the nod

 


China is quickening its approvals for nuclear energy and will launch projects in coastal areas to ensure energy security and economic growth, according to the State Energy Commission.

In a statement released on Sunday, the commission said it discussed strategic problems in the development of the energy resources industry as well as some major projects. The launch of new projects will resume at the proper time and will adopt the highest international safety standards, according to the commission, which met on Friday.

The latest approvals of nuclear plants and other energy projects are part of the government's plan to push economic growth with minimal measures. As the fastest-growing atomic energy nation, China will launch another 8.6GW of capacity for nuclear power this year, according to the National Energy Administration.
That is in stark contrast to the two reactors with 2.1GW of capacity approved in 2013.

Even so, experts argue that the country's reliance on nuclear power is still small. Its 20 reactors in operation contributed only 1.2 percent of the country's energy use in 2013, much lower than the world's average of 9.8 percent. China is quickening its approvals for nuclear energy and will launch projects in coastal areas to ensure energy security and economic growth, according to the State Energy Commission. In a statement released on Sunday, the commission said it discussed strategic problems in the development of the energy resources industry as well as some major projects. The launch of new projects will resume at the proper time and will adopt the highest international safety standards, according to the commission, which met on Friday.The latest approvals of nuclear plants and other energy projects are part of the government's plan to push economic growth with minimal measures.

As the fastest-growing atomic energy nation, China will launch another 8.6GW of capacity for nuclear power this year, according to the National Energy Administration. That is in stark contrast to the two reactors with 2.1GW of capacity approved in 2013. Even so, experts argue that the country's reliance on nuclear power is still small. Its 20 reactors in operation contributed only 1.2 percent of the country's energy use in 2013, much lower than the world's average of 9.8 percent.

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The miners have started 2014 very well indeed on the back of rising gold prices, so the question is; is this the real deal or another head fake? Is the bottom really in? Could there be a final capitulation just ahead of us? Will the summer doldrums take the PMs lower?

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